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Tongue Tie Surgery for Infants

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What is tongue tie treatment?

Tongue tie is often identified at birth or during childhood, and is a common condition. The condition occurs when a child’s tongue is “anchored” and restricts movement, causing a number of difficulties in the sufferer’s ability to eat, drink, and speak. Treatment for tongue tie involves a surgical procedure that snips or revises the restrictive tissue to enable more tongue movement.

Why is tongue tie treatment performed?

Tongue tie treatment is performed to enable a baby or child to properly form speech and feeding, along with other activities that require tongue movement. Surgery may be performed on young children and even babies to correct this issue.

What does tongue tie treatment involve?

Tongue tie surgery, called frenulectomy, is available at New York ENT, and has a high success rate with few complications. For infant and newborn tongue tie treatment, the procedure is usually done in a physician’s office, and for older children, it may be done using general anesthesia. Sometimes, older children can still have the procedure in-office using local anesthesia.

Following the procedure, your doctor will likely recommend speech therapy for children who are of speaking age to address any areas that have been identified as problematic.

What are the benefits of undergoing tongue tie treatment?

The relatively simple surgery can often yield noteworthy results, including:

  • Improved speech
  • Increased self-esteem
  • Ability to latch on mother for breastfeeding (for infants)

If your child is suffering from tongue tie, it is important to schedule an evaluation with an experienced ear, nose and throat doctor. Board certified physicians with New York ENT have extensive experience with tongue tie treatment. Fill out the form on this page or call our office at (212) 873-6168 to schedule an appointment today.

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